Tag: map

U.S. Oil Import Sankey Movie

Renown Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) founded in 1982 by Lovins and Lovins have an interactive oil imports map on their MOVE project webpage.

You can see the oil imports to the United States from January 1973 to August 2008 on a map that depicts the flow quantities as Sankey arrows linking the country of origin and the U.S. If you switch to the unit “Dollar”, you can see the value of the oil imported depicted as Sankey arrows.

One can play the the whole 35-year period as a movie, or use the slider on the time line to see individual months. The data used is from publicy accessible EIA/DOE statistics.

The United States is still 60 % dependent on imported oil. MRI’s MOVE project seeks possibilities to reduce foreign crude oil dependencies. The goal is to “get completely off oil by 2050, led by business for profit.”

Go to the RMI movie page and try it yourself. When I did the Lybia Oil Export map last year I wasn’t aware of this Sankey movie, which is of course much nicer.

Showing Migration Flows as Sankey

Most of the Sankey diagrams I come across on the net focus on energy issues, followed by the topics greenhouse gases and material flows of different kinds. Display of cost Sankey diagrams (value streams) is less common, so are people/passenger flows. An interesting approach is presented with Sankey diagrams that show migration flows between countries, or in and out of a region.

The best one I have seen was in this summary report on ‘Europe’s Demographic Future’ published by Berlin Institute for Population and Development. On page 11 you can see the migration flows within Europe (with omissions). The widest Sankey arrows are for migration movements from Bulgaria and Romania, mainly to Spain. There seems to be a lower cut off threshold at approx. 10.000, which leads to smaller flows not being scaled linearly any more. A lot of interesting details in this one… [would have loved to reproduce it, but permission wasn’t granted].

Here are other samples for Sankey diagrams visualizing migration flows (no quantities given, exact time range unknown).

Emigration flows to North and South America in the first half of the 20th century

Refugee flows in Middle East, Africa and Asia in 2006 (clustered quantities)

Both diagrams found on My Paris Your Paris blog

I think Sankey diagrams in this context merit more attention. Will be looking for more of these…

Oil Exports visualized as Sankey Diagram

After my posts on visualizing Rotterdam port’s imports/exports and on Internet traffic maps, I have started to experiment with showing the export quantities and destinations for a certain trade good.

I wanted to do a Saudia-Arabia or Irak oil export Sankey map, but couldn’t find good data. I finally came across this summary on Lybian oil exports, and converted the data from the pie chart Lybian Oil Exports, by Destination, 2006 to a Sankey style export flow diagram.

It was new to me that “Libya has the largest proven oil reserves in Africa” with 41.5 billion barrels, and estimated net exports of 1.525 million barrels per day in 2006.

The underlying map is a crop from a World map found on Wikicommons. I think it could be a little more transparent though…

World Internet Bandwith Sankey

The cutting of two submarine internet cables in the Mediterranean Sea at the end of January, and another one in the Persian Gulf a few days later, was widely reported in the news. The cuts affected internet services and call center operations in large parts of the Middle East and India, sparking discussions about emergency backup plans for offshore software development.

This reminded me of the internet traffic maps I had seen on the Web before. These are available as traffic load maps as well as bandwidth capacity maps of the backbone infrastructure.

Indeed these maps can be considered as fine examples of Sankey diagrams, with bi-directional (or non-directional?) arrows whose magnitude represent the bandwidth of the transcontinental internet cables. Additional arrow colors could be used, for example, to represent ownership or operation of the cable by different companies.

At the same time the Sankey maps may also serve to indicate communication technology development in different world regions.

BTW, if you want to stick one of these maps prominently on your office wall, they are available as posters here.