Just discovered this new Sankey diagram video via e!Sankey Forum. Apparently just meant as a a show case for the possibilities offered by the e!Sankey software development kit (SDK).

We can see mass flows on a production line with two machines feeding ‘Item A’ and ‘Item B’ into the main production line.

These seem to be hourly flow values over a 30-hour time span. There are some red warnings indicating low buffer, and even one or two times when the production runs dry. Interesting…

Found that there are some more (educational) videos on youtube now that deal with Sankey diagrams.

Steve from wikibudgets.org posted a comment calling attention to a new free web app they have launched on their website.

This is a straight-forward drawing tool for simple left-to-right distribution diagrams. On the website just pick a node (called “budget” there) and an arrow (called “transfer”), add amount, choose color. The elements can be dragged freely in the browser window. Easy zooming with mouse wheel or double-click on an element. The ‘Save Image’ command from the browser’s context menu lets you store a PNG file.

The motto of wikibudgets.org is to “Visualise public budgets. Rationalise politics. Tackle Corruption. Eliminate waste. Fight bureaucracy.” The Sankey diagrams everyone can produce with this tool aim at visualizing financial transfers in US$.

According to the wikibudgets.org blog this is a first early release of the open source Sankey app for desktop UI. Touch friendly editing for mobile devices is under development.

Added to the list of Sankey software.

Found out via the news feed from ifu Hamburg, maker of e!Sankey that they have released an SDK based on e!Sankey that allows software makers to integrate Sankey visualizations into their application.

Two main features help to achieve this: (1) building Sankey diagrams from an XML file that contains structural and layout information (2) feeding values into a Sankey diagram template by reading ID/value pairs from a CSV file.

This is what many have been waiting for, I think. The first Sankey app for iOS.

I have not tested it myself, since I don’t use iOS. But in the video on the Squishlogic website it looks fancy and moving around the nodes seems smooth. In the video they don’t show how arrows are drawn and flow quantitites are entered, but maybe Steve (who pointed out that new tool me) will comment.

Added to the Sankey diagram software list.

Steve Bogart has released a website for autoMATICally creating simple horizontal distribution diagrams. No need to install a tool, just go to sankeymatic.com and enter your values. On each line define source node, quantity in square brackets, destination node (e.g. “Budget [450] Housing” or “Budget [300] Food”). Columns and bands will be created automatically.

A number of options can be set, such as colors, spacing and labels. Finally, when you have created your diagram you can download it directly (three sizes/resolutions available).

This simple online tool is based on the open source tool D3.js and its Sankey library.

Try it out yourself!

I have added SankeyMATIC to the list of software tools for Sankey diagrams (seriously thinking about creating an own group for d3.js-based products).

Over at the TeX – LaTeX Stack Exchange (a Q&A site for users of TeX and LaTeX) this article explains “How to draw a Sankey Diagram using TikZ”. Okay, its a bit techie, but the results look good.

The original poster wanted to know how to draw a Sankey diagram using the TikZ package (TikZ is a “higher-level drawing language built on top of the PGF graphics framework”).

User Paul Gaborit came up with this example using TikZ and building his own sankeydiagram environment

The interesting thing is that flows can fork and join, and that there is a check that the sum of quantities must be equal to the quantity of sankey node to fork.

This is how the the original sample Sankey diagram looks like with this solution.

Very nice result. So for those out there used to working with TeX/LaTeX out this is actually a good solution.

Don’t miss to read the comments too (there’s one pointing to an alternative (Matplotlib and Sankey module).

A number of renown partners such as DOE, NREL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and more) have created FRED (FRee Energy Data). This interactive website allows visualizing energy data for all U.S. federal states. Here is a screengrab for California 2010:

Go to the website directly to experiment yourself. Here is how to proceed: To start, make sure the layers are turned on (button at the top left), then click on the federal state of your choice. In the pop-up window there are four visualization options: Energy Supply, Energy Demand, Energy Flows, and Energy Forecast. Choose ‘Energy Flows’ to produce the typical production/consumption Sankey diagrams. Hover over the bands to see more detail.

FRED is really intuitive and fun to use. And it is open-access. You have more options when you register. According to the About section, among the future planned developments of FRED are “expanding FRED’s US coverage to global, adding energy expenditures and C02 emissions data, and allow[ing] users to extract FRED data and graphics”. Good!

Color gradients seem to be the new like for Sankey diagrams. I already featured an example in yesterday’s post. The new e!Sankey 3.1 version has a color gradient feature now as well.

This diagram is taken from the samples included in the trial version. Traffic flows at a fictitious highway intersection is shown with the number of cars going from A to B, A to C, and so on.

It is not new at all (see this post) but has been pimped and now sports the color effect and some icons. Nice!